Monday, August 16, 2010

A Weekend Mini-Break

I've been missing for a couple days. I took another Friday off from work and we went on a short holiday to the province of Nova Scotia.

This is the first time I've left PEI in over a year and it was wonderful to get out and see some new sights. 

First we went to Halifax and did all the big city items like searching for parking spaces and getting stuck in traffic   ;-)

In all seriousness we enjoyed some shopping as there are stores in Halifax that Charlottetown doesn't offer.  I now have new socks and a lovely woolly winter hat while Jody got wood for his latest furniture project.

We also strolled the boardwalk and happened on the Busker's Festival which was a great way to spend an evening.

From Halifax we drove south to the famed Peggy's Cove.  The landscape here was beyond amazing.  I believe the word they use to describe it is Barrens.  I've never seen anything quite like it.  Large boulders sitting in the most precarious spots, tough rock plants hugging every scrap of dirt they can find.  I would recommend stopping on the pullout outside of town (the north end) and walking the trail to really get a taste of this landscape.

From Peggy's Cove we continued South towards Chester and Mahone Bay, finally stopping in Lunenberg.  Each of these seaside communities featured gorgeous old architecture, plenty of shops, restaurants and lots to see within easy walking distance.  We spent two days taking in as much as we could and could easily have spent many more days.
Peggy's Cove, NS
Town of Lunenberg, NS
Lunenberg has the added charm of being a UNESCO World Heritage site and many of the buildings have plaques stating the year they were built and for whom.  If you hadn't guessed (based on our choice of home) both of us love old buildings so we spent quite a few hours wandering Lunenberg and admiring the architecture.

This lovely house even offered a tour of their garden!  An offer I couldn't refuse.



It was a lovely weekend and a wonderful break that I didn't even realize I needed but it was with great happiness that we returned home.  There's no other place quite like it.

7 comments:

  1. That barren landscape was left behind by the glaciers; it looks just like the blueberry barrens of Maine. Were there blueberries growing there? If you get a chance to try wild, low bush blueberries, don't pass it up; they are amazing! -Jean

    ReplyDelete
  2. That barren landscape was left behind by the glaciers; it looks just like the blueberry barrens of Maine. Were there blueberries growing there? If you get a chance to try wild, low bush blueberries, don't pass it up; they are amazing! -Jean

    ReplyDelete
  3. I so enjoyed yout tour. Someday I will go there...My Great Grandparents left their family farm in Nova Scotia in 1848 to come to the U.S., I've always dreamed of visiting. I guess I kind of did through your words and pictures!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Looks like a nice break from the status quo! I love street festivals, you guys were lucky to wander into one. And a Garden tour to boot!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Jean, you're right. It seems the underlying rock formations were pushed up from the sea during plate movement and the huge boulders were left by glaciers. I've read about it before but have never seen it with my own eyes.

    Meredehuit - That's wonderful you know your family history like that! One thing about the Canadian Maritimes is that everyone seems to know their family history going back many generations. I once mentioned I am of Irish heritage only to be asked what county in Ireland. I had no idea but most people here can trace their heritage back that far and further.

    Laura, isn't that great? We went out for a walk, thinking about some dinner and ended up with fresh lemonade and pizza slices while watching a show! I forget sometimes just how busy cities are and all the various things you can find to see and do. Especially at this time of year.

    ReplyDelete
  6. If you love old buildings and architecture, your tour of my city (and state) would be short. We are pretty young, in a building sense. Things from the 1920's are considered nearly ancient here.

    The houses built right on the rock (seemingly, at least) in that charming cove of blue, blue water remind me of the Sunday school song about the wise man building his house upon the rock, the rains came down, and "the house on the rock stood still." A lovely tour.

    Christine in Alaska

    ReplyDelete
  7. Christine, the west coast of Canada is just the same. Very very few old buildings at all. Probably why I like them so much because they're not something I've seen previously.

    ReplyDelete